Humanities & Sciences (HS)

HS 111  Writing and Analysis I  3 Credits  

This course provides instruction and practice in effective communication and a foundation in college-level academic writing. The course will emphasize the significance of audience and purpose, genre and context, syntax and grammar, as well as the study of various forms of writing, to achieve effective communication. The course is writing intensive and includes revision. HS 111 meets 3 credits of the College Writing Requirement and provides a foundation for future study by assisting students with the development of college-level skills, particularly in reading, writing, research, critical thinking, and communication.

HS 112  Writing and Analysis II  3 Credits  

The second in a sequence with HS 111. This course provides instruction and practice in effective communication and a foundation in college-level academic writing and research. The course emphasizes the significance of audience and purpose, genre and context, syntax and grammar, as well as the study of various forms of writing, to achieve effective communication. The course is writing intensive and includes revision. HS 112 meets 3 credits of the College Writing Requirement and creates a foundation for future study by assisting students with the development of college-level skills, particularly in reading, writing, research, critical thinking, and communication.

HS 121  Integrated Studies: FY Seminar  3 Credits  

Integrated Studies Seminars are a part of the First-Year Program for performing arts students, fulfilling 6 credits of their general education requirements for the BFA/BMUS degrees (3 credit hours/term). These seminars provides entering students with an introduction to college learning through exploration in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. In addition, Integrated Studies Seminars promote an understanding of the nature and value of liberal arts learning by providing opportunities to engage with problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Integrated Studies Seminars are taken in conjunction with HS 111/112 IS: Writing and Analysis, which fulfills the College writing Requirement (3 credits/term for a total of 6 credits). This full-year 12 credit-hour program helps prepare students for the remainder of their college program and life after graduation.

HS 122  Integrated Studies: FY Seminar  3 Credits  

Integrated Studies Seminars are a part of the First-Year Program for performing arts students, fulfilling 6 credits of their general education requirements for the BFA/BMUS degrees (3 credit hours/term). These seminars provides entering students with an introduction to college learning through exploration in the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. In addition, Integrated Studies Seminars promote an understanding of the nature and value of liberal arts learning by providing opportunities to engage with problems and issues from multiple perspectives. Integrated Studies Seminars are taken in conjunction with HS 111/112 IS: Writing and Analysis, which fulfills the College writing Requirement (3 credits/term for a total of 6 credits). This full-year 12 credit-hour program helps prepare students for the remainder of their college program and life after graduation. Recent HS 121/122 Integrated Studies: First-Year Seminar offerings have included: Self and Society; City as a Work of Art; Global Urban Ecology; The Power of Story, and Gender Identity and Human Rights.

HS 201  Writing Center Theory and Pedagogy  3 Credits  

Designed for those hired as Peer Consultants in the Writing Center, students will learn about, analyze and apply multiple theories of one-to-one writing consultation. Topics investigated include: theories of writing acquisition; collaborative and peer-to-peer learning; the language learning process and how to support multilingual writers; using digital technologies in writing consultation; and the role of writing centers in social justice work around race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability. Students may expect learning experiences ranging from reading and writing to hands-on experimentation with consulting practices and project-based learning. Students will also pursue a self-directed project, with options including action research, developing workshops and curriculum for the center, or writing an article for submission to a Writing Center publication. In addition to preparing students to be effective consultants in the Cornish Writing Center, the course will enrich students’ abilities as peer-to-peer collaborators and provide a foundation for future work as educators. Meeting times to be determined with instructor. Enrollment by permission of HS Department Chair.

HS 204  Writing Short Fiction  3 Credits  

In this course, the fundamentals of fiction writing - character, plot, theme, point of view, voice, and imagery - are explored in a workshop format. Includes writing assignments, lectures, group discussion of each participant's work, and readings of modern and contemporary short-story writers. NOTE: This course does not satisfy the College Writing Requirement

HS 208  Intro to Digital Humanities  3 Credits  

What does the digital age, when we can write and publish with the click of a mouse, mean for how we think about authorship and publishing? What does it mean for how we compose and publish visual and multi-media art, fiction, non-fiction, and poetry? We'll read, explore and analyze digital literature, blogs, and online arts journals to consider how digital composing, editing, and publishing differs from our print-centric models and how it may impact the process, business, and cultural role of the artist. Readings will include essays on course themes, digital literature, and selected online publications. Students will work independently and in groups to compose, edit, and publish their own digital works, applying the analysis and observations they've made during the semester to a polished online work in a medium of their choice. Students should be prepared for a sizable reading and writing load and opportunities to learn new software.

HS 218  Biological Sciences & Environment  3 Credits  

An introduction to environmental science, this course examines the biological systems of the Earth and their impact on the biosphere. Topics include the study of general principles of ecology, natural selection and evolution, genetics, animal behavior, and/or ecosystem structure and function.

HS 219  Env. Science: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Alternating by year with HS 217 and HS 218, this sequence consists of two one-semester courses on special topics.

HS 235  Anthropology: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special Topics in Anthropology address specific areas or issues within this field. Content and reading list vary with instructor.

HS 248  Literature: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special Topics in Literature courses offer a focused exploration of significant issues in literature, such as author, time period, place, culture, difference, and linguistics. Literature Special Topics courses have included: Literature of the South, Imagining Africa, American Myths, Light and Darkness-Heart and Soul in the New Millennium, William Faulkner, Magical Realism, and Literature of the Harlem Renaissance.

HS 250  Performance Art: History & Theory  3 Credits  

This course is based on lectures and readings in the history and theory of performance art. The objective of the course is to acquaint the student with the historical record of production and theory so he/she will be informed of the fundamental principles that both produce and evaluate performance art. An additional goal is that students will be conversant in contemporary issues and intellectual foundations currently developing in performance art theory. During the last three weeks of the course, students will present brief performances. Content and reading list vary by term.

HS 260  Humanities: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special Topics in the Humanities courses provide an opportunity to focus on specific time periods, themes, problems, or disciplines within the humanities. Recent humanities special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Contemporary Art: The End Game?, Certainty, the Art of Living, Natural Law and Human Nature, Creative Writing: The Short Story, Stoicism, Ethics and Values, Revisioning Feminism in the Visual Arts, and the Literature, Theater and Film of the Pacific and New Zealand

HS 270  Sciences: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special Topics in the Sciences Humanities courses investigate specific problems, themes, or disciplines within the sciences. Recent science special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Evolution by Nature, Stuffing Animals: The Art and Science of Taxidermy, Math in Society, Cartography: The Art and Science of Mapping, Wildlife in Film, Human Evolution and Biological Anthropology, and Illustrating Science.

HS 280  Social Science: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special Topics in Social Science address ideas and themes not covered in Introduction to Social Science. Recent social science special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Unpacking the Political, Global Health Geography, Ancient Landscapes, The Anthropology of Death, Temple, Tomb and Archive, Human Evolution and Biological Anthropology, and the Natural and Cultural History of the Pacific Northwest.

HS 285  Political Science: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Special topics in Political Science address specific areas or issues within this field. Recent special topics in political science have included Unpacking the Political

HS 295  Multi-Disciplinary: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Multidisciplinary Special Topics courses engage two or more disciplines to understand phenomena such as global issues or historical events.

HS 298  Independent Study  1.00 - 4.00 Credits  

Focuses on a special project of the student's choice and design that is unavailable within the regular curriculum. Second-Year standing and permission from HS Department Chair required.

HS 360  Humanities: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Upper-level Special Topics in the Humanities courses provide an opportunity to focus on specific time periods, themes, problems, or disciplines within the humanities. Recent humanities special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Contemporary Art: The End Game?, Certainty, the Art of Living, Natural Law and Human Nature, Creative Writing: The Short Story, Stoicism, Ethics and Values, Revisioning Feminism in the Visual Arts, and the Literature, Theater and Film of the Pacific and New Zealand.

HS 370  Sciences: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Upper-level Special Topics in the Sciences Humanities courses investigate specific problems, themes, or disciplines within the sciences. Recent science special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Evolution by Nature, Stuffing Animals: The Art and Science of Taxidermy, Math in Society, Cartography: The Art and Science of Mapping, Wildlife in Film, Human Evolution and Biological Anthropology, and Illustrating Science.

HS 380  Social Sciences: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Upper-Level Special Topics in the Social Sciences. Classes are likely to draw from fields such as sociology, anthropology, psychology, political science or a number of interdisciplinary subjects. Recent social science special topics at the 200 and 300 level have included Unpacking the Political, Global Health Geography, Ancient Landscapes, The Anthropology of Death, Temple, Tomb and Archive, Human Evolution and Biological Anthropology, and the Natural and Cultural History of the Pacific Northwest.

HS 381  Research Writing  3 Credits  

Students in Research Writing will plan and implement a semester-long individual project with the purpose of understanding the communities and identities we inhabit. By situating a research question in the context of a community of people, students will be able to blend google, database, and library research with fieldwork: interviews, observations, and collecting and analyzing written and visual documents. The semester-long process will involve the writing of a proposal, summary and synthesis of both colloquial and scholarly perspectives, analysis of documents collected from communities, and descriptions of interviews and observations. As a final product, students will write a multi-draft paper presenting their discoveries. Students should expect to be challenged to investigate multiple perspectives (including their own), hone their skills at synthesizing various types of sources, and revise their writings to fit their chosen audience and purpose.

HS 382  Writing: Special Topics  3 Credits  

Upper-level Special Topics in Writing courses provide an opportunity to focus on specific issues within the field.

HS 498  Independent Study  1.00 - 4.00 Credits  

Focuses on a special project of the student's choice and design that is unavailable within the regular curriculum. Prerequisites: senior standing and permission from HS Department Chair. Credits vary between 1 and 4.